Building an automatic plant waterer (4/?): Calibrating the sensor

A short day in the attic today.

  • Part 1: resistive sensing
  • Part 2: finding resistive sensing is bad and capacitive sensing is hard
  • Part 3: another crack at a capacitive sensor
  • Part 4: calibrating the sensor

Day VII (weekend 6)

First, to check everything’s OK, I’m going to calibrate the sensor. I have a box of cheap ceramic capacitors in the E3 series and I’m going to go from 10pF to 2200pF, and I’m going to measure them with my old Academy PG015 capacitance meter since it’s likely to be more accurate than the capacitor rating.

Here are the measurements:

Rating Measured capacitance (pf) count
0 0 12.99
10 10.5 18.84
22 22.6 25.80
47 48.3 40.48
100 101.7 70.90
220 221 134.03
470 453 259.21
1000 965 539.16
2200 2240 1227.2

I’m not 100% sure how to fit this. The obvious choice is a least squares straight line fit to find the slope and offset. However, the variance increases with the measurement and I didn’t record that. Also, I don’t know what the error on the capacitance meter is like.

So, I think the best choice is a fit in log space. The fixed slope of line works well with errors on both measurements and it deals with higher measurements having higher variance, to some extent. The equation to map measurements (M) to capacitances (C) is:
C = p_1 ( M + p_2)

So we just take the log of that and do least squares on the result. The code is really simple in Octave:

% Data
d = [
0 0 12.99
10 10.5 18.84
22 22.6 25.80
47 48.3 40.48
100 101.7 70.90
220 221 134.03
470 453 259.21
1000 965 539.16
2200 2240 1227.2
];

% Initial parameters: zero point and shift
p=[1 1];

% Least squares in log space
err = @(p) sum((log(d(2:end,2)) - (log(p(1)) + log(d(2:end,3) + p(2)))).^2);

% Find the parameters
p = fminunc(err, p);

count=115;

% Compute the capacitance for a new measurement
p(1) * (count + p(2))

Nice and easy now does it work? Well, it seems to work with a variety of capacitors I tried it with. And to get intermediate values, I tried it with this rather delightful device from a long dead radio (range 16pF to 493pF):20190317_173744

and it works beautifully!

So, then I tries it on the wire wound capacitive sensor. Can you guess if it worked?

Well, it did! Funny thing though is that my capacitance meter didn’t work on that. Naturally I assumed my home built device was wrong. But it seems life wanted to troll me. Here’s what my capacitance meter does when all is good:

SCR25

Nice and easy. Changing the range switch alters the speed of the downwards decay curve. So far so good. But when I attached my sensor, this happened:

SCR26

Well, it did! Funny thing though is that my capacitance meter didn’t work on that. Naturally I assumed my home built device was wrong. But it seems life wanted to troll me. Here’s what my capacitance meter does when all is good:

Absolutely no idea why. It is a big coil, so it might have something to do with the inductance, or maybe pickup. I expect it has a higher input impedance than my device.

TL;DR a short one today, but the sensor works well and is in excellent agreement with my dedicated capacitance meter.

3 thoughts on “Building an automatic plant waterer (4/?): Calibrating the sensor

  1. Pingback: Building an automatic plant waterer (3/?): capacitive sensor try 2 | Death and the penguin

  2. Pingback: Building an automatic plant waterer (2/?): resistive sensing | Death and the penguin

  3. Pingback: Building an automatic plant waterer (1/?): resistive sensing | Death and the penguin

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