louder, Louder, LOUDER! (or: more dead bugging)

Sometimes someone makes a chip to do just what you want.

I’ve recently been needing to generate beeps from a BLE113 module (it’s a CC2541) which runs off a CR2032 coin cell at a nominal 3V, but more like 2 to 2.5 in practice. The speaker of choice is a surface mount piezo sounder which are small (9mm square) and unlike the discs don’t require mounting on a sounding board to get sound out. I’ve not idea if those Murata ones are the best, but it’s a respectable brand and those are the first I found that seemed to meet the spec.

They’re not especially loud, only 65dB at 1.5V pk-pk. The microcontroller I’m using has 4 useful channels on timer 1 for this application, and of course the outputs are totem pole outputs. So, driving it with two PWM channels in opposition is driving it with an H bridge which gives the full 2-3V pk-pk swing (depending on the battery voltage).

That makes it little louder, but not an awful lot. The datasheet says that the sounders can be driven at up to 12V pk-pk without damage. The datasheet however merely notes that it is “probable” that increasing the voltage will increase the volume, which is a bit unhelpful, though it has a graph for one (not the one I want) showing an increase with voltage exactly as you’d expect.The question then is how to generate a higher voltage for the buzzer. I had lots of ideas:

    Boost / switched capacitor converter and another H bridge (impractical–too many components)A miniature transformer (none quite small enough or with the right turns ratio)A miniature autotransformer (closer, but still the same problem)Something cunning with an inductor—some sort of ad-hoc boost thing which generates spikes rather than a square wave. Idea not really fully formed.

None of them are really any good. They’re either require impractically large number of components, components that either don’t exist (or I can’t find) or are vague and ill formed and I don’t have the parts to test the idea and anyway I’d probably end up busting up the chip with voltage spikes.

Fortunately it appears that someone thought of this already. It turns out the PAM8904 already does exactly this. It’s a switched capacitor converter with an H bridge, that takes a digital signal in, precisely for the application of driving piezo sounders from low power microcontrollers. Which is nice.

Except I’m not very trusting, and I’ve no idea if it’s worth the effort. I don’t want to order a circuit board and then fiddle around hand soldering QFNs (I’ve seen it done, I’d rather use a stencil) for a one off test. Like so many chips, it’s QFN only now. So the obvious thing to do is to buy one and deadbug it.

I figured I’d try the nice fine hookup wire I’ve got. The colours make it a bit easier to follow which wire is which. Next time, I’d try the same soldering job with enamelled wire. It’s harder to strip and tin, but the insulation doesn’t get in the way. The key to getting the soldering to work in the end was to tape down the wires with masking tape (3M blue tape) as I went along. Even with that it’s two steps forward, one back as you accidentally desolder wires when trying to attach new ones. Here it is!

IMG_20160728_180707IMG_20160728_185724.

(OK, not as good as this, or this, or this—hey that socket is a really nice idea!)

Spot the schoolboy error? I remembered to check continuity between neighbouring pins, but I forgot to pot it or otherwise protect the wires and so some of them fell off when I tried to change the boost voltage selection. And then another 4 wires fell off when I was taking it out. The connection area is tiny and the solder work is frankly not that good, so the joints are amazingly fragile. It’s what I should have done first time, doubly so because the bits of stiff wire for the breadboard really get in the way.

IMG_20160729_134402IMG_20160729_135338

Well, it seems to operate correctly, but I think I’d do it differently next time. A chip socket or veroboard with .1″ header soldered in is a much better choice than flying wires. Potting makes it as robust, but you have to pot it before you know it works.

It’s always a bit hard to tell volume because ears have a logarithmic response and at 4kHz the sound is quite directional. Nonetheless it’s noticeably louder. Yay 🙂

 

 

One thought on “louder, Louder, LOUDER! (or: more dead bugging)

  1. Pingback: Blog as you go: sigma delta DAC | Death and the penguin

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